88 GTI 8v first start after 10 years any advice welcome

Discussion in '8-valve' started by GTIBOB, Jul 14, 2020.

  1. GTIBOB

    GTIBOB Paid Member Paid Member

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    Eventually managed to prise off pulley.then discovered WP pulley also has to come off. Similar wrestling match and skinned knuckles but now pulleys and covers off .So belt and tensioner next. Bit annoyed tensioner is not a self adjusting spring loaded so have to wing it to get tension correct. Now need to get one of those tensioner levers with the two pins unless anyone has an alternative that works
    Not oil just WD on old belt
     

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  2. GVK

    GVK Paid Member Paid Member

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    Have used right-angled circlip pliers before, the proper tool is better though.

    Make sure you mark the gear that drives the distributor so the ignition timing stays correct.
     
    Last edited: Mar 6, 2021
  3. GTIBOB

    GTIBOB Paid Member Paid Member

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    Cheers GVK
    Invested in Tipex already. Won’t be letting anything move a gnats whisker. Hoping the worst that can happen is timing might be a little out but being a non interference engine I’m not that concerned.
    Be interesting to see what first startup with new belt goes like
     
  4. rubjonny

    rubjonny Administrator Staff Member Admin

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    you can al;so use the '1 allen key' method. put your socket on the tensioner nut, fit allen key into a tensioner hole and push down on it bracing to the socket till you get required tension, nip nut
     
  5. GTIBOB

    GTIBOB Paid Member Paid Member

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    So timing belt now changed. What was I worried about? Well not exactly every stage had its own frustrations.but hey we’re here for the success stories. So just before fitting top belt cover I wanted to start up to see how belt was tracking and if any noises. Started then stopped, just wouldn’t run. Thinking you’ve done it now. Then noticed I hadn’t refitted the throttle body to the air intake ducting which I had removed for access. To much to hope for but I re connected the duct to the air filter and started up perfectly to about 800 idle. Was assured belt replacement was a breeze and whilst I wouldn’t describe it as a simple process it’s very doable with patience and few decent tools. Almost bottled it and was going to get local garage to do it until the sucking through the teeth started...” you never know with that old stuff bolts seized etc could take a day £280 labour” so decided on principle let’s do this. In no small way due to encouragement on here I can now say I’ve done a cam belt change for the price if the kit. Scrubbed the rust off the metal top cover primed and sprayed black. Icing on top putting on the sticker with the date and miles when changed. Sad but true.
    Rear callipers change and handbrake next.....
    Is it risky to give engine a good high rev after changing belt? I’ve been nursing it on a 20 year old belt up until today never reving over 2 or 3K. Suppose a redline is out of the question for the old girl?

    By the way the old belt looked as good as the new one . Bit dusty but no signs of cracking, fraying or obvious deterioration??

    The price of peace of mind
     
    Last edited: Mar 9, 2021
    davkav likes this.
  6. costel1969

    costel1969 Paid Member Paid Member

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    Why would would you not rev it over 2-3k?
    It’s a Mk2 GTI - if you can’t rev one of those what can you rev?
    Let her warm up and away you go - I don’t recommend bouncing it off the rev limiter but other than that have at it man.
     
  7. GTIBOB

    GTIBOB Paid Member Paid Member

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    Now that most of the servicing is done and engine seems to be running as it should is there anything which might need a clean out in terms of the air intake or breathers.
    Other than a new air filter I’ve done nothing with any of the intake or air or vacuum lines. Everything looks to be connected and in order. I remember using a special electrical spray cleaner on the mass air flow sensor on my BM diesel.
    Is there anything Re air flow cleaning which would ensure engine is breathing freely ?
     
  8. costel1969

    costel1969 Paid Member Paid Member

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    Best thing you could do now is take that car out for a proper test drive. You've done everything you need to do, now get her out on the road and to paraphrase the legendary Basil Fawlty - "give her a damn good thrashing". This is the only way to truly know how the car is going and I would be very suprised if it doesn't perform like a champ.
     
    Simon Peter Dodgson likes this.
  9. GTIBOB

    GTIBOB Paid Member Paid Member

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    is there anything which might need a clean out in terms of the air intake or breathers.
    Other than a new air filter I’ve done nothing with any of the intake or air or vacuum lines. Everything looks to be connected and in order. I remember using a special electrical spray cleaner on the mass air flow sensor on my BM diesel.
    Is there anything Re air flow cleaning which would ensure engine is breathing freely ?
     
  10. costel1969

    costel1969 Paid Member Paid Member

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    Robert, you've asked the question already and I don't know exactly what you're expecting for a response. You've done a significant amount of work to get the car ready and as far as I'm concerned there is nothing else to do other than drive it. Is there any evidence to indicate there's anything wrong with the vacuum / intake lines? Is the car not starting or running badly / poor idling / cutting out/ backfiring/ lumpy in anyway ?
    If the answer is a resounding no to all of the above then you have your answer - it's time to get in the driver's seat and give it a good drive that's what a GTI is for. I haven't sat in mine almost 18 months because I can't access it due to COVID-19 and I'd give anything to be in your shoes right now.

    Edit: Apologies in advance if I seem blunt but we can only repair/maintain and tweak them for so long and after that you've got to put the work to the test. I'm no loon on the road (back in the day, maybe a little) but you've got to drive it - is there a private/quiet road close by that you could take it to and give it a shakedown run (you don't have to hit Warp Factor 10) - there is no greater test and unless it's going to be in a motoring museum, that will knock the cobwebs off and tell you exactly how it's behaving.
     
    Last edited: Mar 19, 2021
  11. GTIBOB

    GTIBOB Paid Member Paid Member

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    Costel
    Many thanks for taking the time to respond. Don’t worry I’m not easily offended. I knew when I reposted that some may wonder why.
    I entirely agree with everything you’ve said and your irritation is understandable. If I could drive it now I would but until I get a professional thumbs up on the brakes I can’t take beyond the driveway. Car will be trailered to local garage in a week or so to double check all brake lines and brake balance and general pre MOT check over. Everything I’ve done so far has been using jacks and axle stands lying on back. I really need to examine everything comfortably from underneath. In particular I want a close look at the bulkhead just above the exhaust manifold heat shield. I’ve read that holes can appear there. It’s difficult to see clearly with a torch from above. I see what looks like a flake of underseal and need a close up to check it’s not a hole. I wish I wasn’t so pessimistic looking for problems that are not there. I’m pretty sure it’s sound .
    I’m delighted the engine appears to be running , idling and revving well. Reason I asked the air intake question again was just in case there is a particular hose or component that can get blocked and need cleaned out. Again looking for problems.
    this is the first resto project I’ve tackled. I’ve gained a lot of knowledge and had lots of encouragement from everyone on CGTI to whom I am very grateful. Confidence comes with experience.
    I’m bursting to get it out on the road but I can wait another week or so to have peace of mind. If I were 20 years younger I probably couldn’t resist the temptation.
    Forgive the rambling.
    Hope to report on first drive in 20 years soon. CGTI sticker already in rear window
     
  12. costel1969

    costel1969 Paid Member Paid Member

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    You could probably give the brake lines a good validation by using a pressurized brake bleeder - I’ve got a Motive Power unit and I swear by them - you can pressurize to about 10psi and if it holds pressure it confirms there are no leaks and use it to pump new brake fluid into the system and get the old out.
     
  13. GTIBOB

    GTIBOB Paid Member Paid Member

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    So after moving the GTI back into garage I find this on ground.
    Putting the experts to the test
    Name this part ( answers on a postcard) BE8A9FD8-8C46-40AA-B8BB-AD8761E970C7.jpeg 50884405-36EA-4B6F-8001-956AD1CDDDB5.jpeg
     
  14. GTIBOB

    GTIBOB Paid Member Paid Member

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    So I reckon this is the remnants of the shift relay lever ball
    This is where I suspect it used to be (see pic).
    I see lots of kits for refurbishing the gear linkage.
    Should I just replace the ball or is it worth getting a full bush kit.
    There is now about 50mm play in stick although all gears can still be selected.
     

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  15. H8V

    h8v Forum Member

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    I reckon it's always getting the full bush kit, and also the spherical bearing at the bottom of the gearstick.

    Makes it seem like a new car!
     
  16. Simon Peter Dodgson Forum Member

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  17. Giraffe

    Giraffe New Member

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  18. H8V

    h8v Forum Member

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  19. GTIBOB

    GTIBOB Paid Member Paid Member

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    Cheers for the links...great help. finished replacing all the linkage bushes tonight. There is a bit of vertical play in the gear lever but not that noticeable. I’ll do the ball and gear shaft bushes in summer.
    Didn’t realise how bad some of the bushes were. Worst were the relay shaft top and bottom they just crumbled and fell out. To be expected I suppose.so good to get these done.
    Whilst tidying up I noticed this black bung on a dry tube on top of gear box (see pic) what’s this? Is it for lubricant for gear selector below???
     

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  20. rubjonny

    rubjonny Administrator Staff Member Admin

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    no thats just a breather
     

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